Ancient Babylonian and Assyrian Vampires

Variations: LAMIA, Lilatou, Lilats, Lîlît, LILITH
As far back as the 24th century B. C., the people of Babylon and then later Assyria supposed that vampires were demonic beings who were not of this plane of existence. Therefore, in order for them to interact and assault humans, the demons had to possess corpses. As an even greater insult to humanity, and as an example of how evil these beings were, the demons specifically chose to inhabit the bodies of women. To these ancient people, women were considered to be the living symbol of life, and this concept was a nearsacred thing—their menstrual cycles, which were in rhythm with the cycles of the moon, were linked to the planting and harvesting of crops. Nothing in their eyes could have been seen as being more perverse than the very symbols of life and life-giving beings turning into violent monstrosities that sought to consume the flesh and blood of children. These vampires were further described as being very fast and shameless in their pursuit of destruction. They needed to feed in order to maintain the capability of the corpse they utilized.
Source: Budge, Babylonian Life and History, 142­43; Campbell, Masks of Gods; Hayes, Five Quarts, 187; Summers, Vampire: His Kith and Kin; Summers, Vampire in Lore and Legend, 267; Thompson, Devils and Evil Spirits of Babylonia; Varner, Creatures in the Mist, 93

Encyclopedia of vampire mythology . 2014.

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